Saturday, 6 April 2013

Where can I get a cutting of the root of all evil?

This is not a subject I like talking/writing about, but I am once again forced to air it to prevent descending into madness.

In the past four days I have had my evening meal interrupted 3 times by fund-raisers from charities to which I already donate asking me to consider giving by direct debit.

Now not only do I object very strongly to being harangued (however politely) by phone and in my precious evening, feed and relax time, but the fact that they are bombarding me with requests to do what I have already refused to do, is driving me nuts.

I have written many times in this blog about my system of giving, and I always make it plain that the only way I am prepared to give is using my carefully thought out system.

This evening's caller was quite put out when I said "no, I prefer to give on a rota system and am not prepared to take on any more direct debits".

Why?

Yes, I suspect I do actually know why.  Obviously a regular commitment means it would be harder for me to refuse than an ad hoc appeal.

I pointed out that I do not have an endless supply of spare cash, nor have I access to a bank with only three walls, and the income I have is not going to increase.

Therefore, I need the freedom to be able to turn down a request should it be necessary.

So far, I have not taken this option, but times are hard, for everyone and it may happen at some time that there will be no more 'give away' cash, and I want to have that small get-out clause.

It looks as though all the charities are coming round to the same idea, have you noticed the increase of appeals for direct debit payments from the major charities on TV?

Please tell me if I am being unreasonable, and if I am not, has anyone any idea how to stop the calls?

8 comments:

  1. no I don't think you're unreasonable...it's your money...we did have something in this country called "a do not call list" that you could sign up for...I'm not sure anybody uses it now that most everyone has a cell/mobile phone

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  2. I completely agree. Here , in New Zealand, I have found that when I say that I give to "X" number of charities and, although I would love to, am not financially able to donate to any more the conversation finishes quickly.

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  3. Hi Theanne. We have a telephone preference list and I have twice signed up for that, but it makes very little difference.
    These calls are all on my landline, I don't use a mobile phone except to call taxis in emergencies, so they have to use my land line.

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  4. The problem I have Heather, is that these are all charities to which I already subscribe. I just want to stop them ringing me, but trying to make them understand how I work seems to be impossible.

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  5. I hate to say this, Ray, but a letter of complaint to the management of each charity may be the only way to go to stop this. They really do have to make it clear to their fund-raisers that badgering people is unfair and counterproductive. You might be able to do it by email from the charity's website to save postage costs. Good luck. It would make me furious too.

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  6. Oh dear, this is where my inner wimp manifests itself. I hate the thought of complaining officially but maybe you're right perpetua.
    It really is getting more than just annoying.
    I'll try to dredge up the necessary blend of courage and moral indignation.

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  7. I too sympathize. I have the same problem! And so does my husband. We both already have direct debits in place separately and lately the calls have become very persistent. Several left on the answer phone whilst we were away!
    It actually has the reverse effect of what they intend!

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  8. Hello Jean, I had just sat at the computer intending to have another rant on the same subject, but it would appear that we are all getting the same treatment.
    Just as I finished watching my weekly dose of Holby City the phone rang, this time it was The British Legion, would I consider giving by direct debit?
    I think it must be because they know that pensions are going to be 'fixed' for the next three years and they are clearly afraid of losing donations. I imagine they think if people are committed to a regular monthly amount they will be too embarrassed to stop the payments.
    They are driving me mad.
    Oh by the way, breathe, welcome back to the UK.

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