Tuesday, 19 July 2011

My Ears are Burning

Returning from an averagely irritating morning in St.M's my usually peacefull homeward journey by bus was shattered by the loud jangling 'music' of a mobile phone.

"I'm on the bus" bawled the massive blond in front of me, "yeah, I know I did, but I was eld up wasn't I"?

Would have taken a crane to hold her up, was my less than generous thought.

I'm not gererally quite so sour, but i wanted a quiet journey in which to reflect on some of the morning's more challenging happenings and with 'rent-a-mouth' sitting in front of me that was not going to happen.

What is it about this infernal invention that encourages otherwise apparently normal people to become public address systems, hell-bent on passing all the most private pieces of information imaginable on to the world at large.?

The average walk in town will let you in to the most secret and personal (and unwanted) information about the day-to-day lives of everyone you pass whether you are interested or not.

"I'm in the supermarket, just by the pharmacy, what did you want again?"

"I'm not buying you those, you can get them yourself"

As she heads into the Ladies loo still talking, I wonder briefly just how far this running commentary will go.

All these people, at a quick glance. look perfectly normal, it is only on closer inspection, and when they briefly remove the gadget from the side of their heads that you realise their ears are much larger, much redder than they should be,

Will future children be born with ten fingers on each hand - the better to text- and Spock like ears large and pointed to accommodate the permanent phone-dock.

And, what about the rest of the population, will we have an in-built switch to turn off unwanted, intrusive mobile monologues from unknown passers-by?

Why must we have every bit of our own space invaded by other peoples' lives?

Interest in our fellow man is one thing, in-yer-face, live cinema is something else.

End of today's rant.

7 comments:

  1. That't telling them, Ray! As someone who uses her pay-as-you-go mobile as little as possible, I'm with you all the way on this. Why have we got to the place where people must be in touch with others all the time, however trivial the communication? Grrr!

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  2. Thanks for the support Perpetua.
    Whilst I can see how usefull it could be to have an all singing/dancing phone in a real emergency, the endless stream of absolute piffle issuing from most peoples' mouths via their electronic prosthetics bores me rigid.
    There. That feels better now!

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  3. I used to feel lost without my "mobile", as if something terrible might happen if folk couldn't get in touch with me. I had to have it on me at all times. Since moving to Argyll I haven't been able to use it for the last 6 months because theres now signal due to the terrain. And guess what ? I don't need it.....

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  4. People with headphones on who listen to music at such a high volume that others can hear it too is an irritation. People who don't blow their noses but sniff continuously very loudly on trains. Golly, I better stop now.

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  5. Tootallburd
    I'm so glad to read your comment. I was beginning to think i was the only non-mobile-chatterer left on the planet.
    I won't use my phone except in emergencies and to call taxis etc.
    It is not switched on, nor will it be.

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  6. Tootallburd
    I'm so glad to read your comment. I was beginning to think i was the only non-mobile-chatterer left on the planet.
    I won't use my phone except in emergencies and to call taxis etc.
    It is not switched on, nor will it be.

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  7. Jane
    I do so agree. I find all sounds which are inflicted/imposed on other people, leaving them helpless to opt out totally unacceptable.
    As for the no hanky brigade I could cheerfully brain them.
    Oh what a lovely rant I'm having. Haven't had this much fun since smoking in public places was banned!

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